Posted in resources, writer life, writing advice

Lessons Learned: Book Signing Events

One of the many things I never thought I’d have to do when I decided to become an author was public speaking. My mentality was that book signings are only for big-name authors. Nobody is going to want a signed copy from a debut indy author. They only want best-sellers. Boy, was I wrong.

I recently did a book signing at a public library near where I grew up. I loved every minute of it, but there were a few things I could have been better prepared for. Here are a few takeaways I have after being a part of my first author event.

BRING MORE BOOKS THAN YOU THINK YOU NEED
People love signed books. I thought that since this event was in such a small town, I wouldn’t need very many books. The library was packed to the gills. I could have sold twice as many books if I’d had them. Next time, I’ll double the number of books I take. Turning people away because you are out of books is a terrible feeling.

BE READY FOR SOME NON-BOOK/WRITING QUESTIONS
I’m a prepper. I spent time reviewing interview transcripts from authors I follow to try and see what kind of questions I would have to answer. I wasn’t prepared for the questions about me and my life. People find it fascinating that you were able to write a book and want to know about you. Not just your work.

HAVE SWAG AND TELL PEOPLE ABOUT IT
Everybody loves free stuff. Having a few free giveaways on your table is a must. This will help people find your book later if you run out, and it helps promote your brand. Just be sure you tell people you have it before they start coming up. The transition from Q&A to signing was so fast that I forgot to tell people I had bookmarks and pens they could have for free until they got up to the table. It does no good to have swag if nobody knows to take it.

DON’T FORGET TO TELL PEOPLE WHAT YOUR BOOK IS ABOUT
I feel like this one should have been obvious, but I totally forgot it. I introduced myself and gave a bit of my background, but it took somebody asking me what my book was about for me to give the synopsis. Embarrassing, I know. Maybe lead with that one next time.

Author events are a fun way to get your book in front of readers and interact with them. While no two events are the same, it’s always good to cover the basics. Do some prep work ahead of time to be prepared when that inevitable curveball arrives.

Posted in resources, writing advice

The Writer’s Toolkit

Craftsmen have toolkits full of the essential equipment they need to do their jobs. Writers are no different. We work with words the same way a carpenter works with wood. We build on our ideas and whittle away at them until we have something beautiful.

Every writer’s toolkit is going to look different, but just like a carpenter’s hammer, there will be a few key things every writer will need to make sure they are prepared to do their work.

  1. Notebooks/Note Pads/Pens/Pencils
    • Ideas are like waterfalls. There is no stopping them when they come to you. Having something to jot those ideas down as you work can help you keep your flow without losing what comes to mind. Take a brief moment to write down what pops into your mind as a reminder to come back to it later. Once it is out of your head, you can get back to focusing on the task at hand.
  2. Drinks/Snacks
    • Eliminating as many distractions as possible before you start makes it easier to stay on task.  Make sure you load up on your coffee, tea, water, girl scout cookies, granola, or whatever you prefer before you get started. This will help reduce the number of times you get up and walk away from your work.
  3. Comfy chair
    • You are going to be spending a fair amount of time in your writing spot. Whether you do long sessions or sprints, you need to make sure you are comfortable. Constantly shifting around in your seat is going to distract you from your work. Find yourself a good office chair that will support your spine and allow you to settle in and pound the keyboard when the time comes.
  4. Blue light glasses
    • Now, bear with me here. I know not every writer wears glasses, but we do spend a lot of time looking at screens. This can put unnecessary strain on your eyes. Blue light glasses can help reduce this strain without the need for a prescription. You can pick up a simple pair at most box sores or on Amazon for relatively cheap.

These are just a few things to consider putting in your toolkit. For more ideas on what you might need for yours, visit the Modern Boss Boutique.